iMarket Solutions Blog : Posts Tagged ‘Algorithm’

Google Penguin 3.0 – The Algorithm Refresh That Should Have Been an Update

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

On October 4, 2013, Matt Cutts announced the release of Penguin 2.1 – an update to their infamous algorithm that targets spammy onsite and offsite SEO strategies. Quite a few webmasters in the SEO community reported that the 2.1 update had quite the negative impact on their websites. And due to the nature of this particular algorithm, a recovery is not possible without a manual update, or refresh, of the algorithm being pushed through by Google.

The Google Penguin thug

The Google Penguin thug

Many people perceive the Penguin algorithm as nothing more than a thug, here to force thousands of small businesses into paid advertisement on Google by tanking their organic visibility. So I’m sure you can imagine the unrest within the community as the one year anniversary of the last update passed. But on Friday (October 17th, 2014), webmasters finally got their wish – Google began rolling out Penguin 3.0. Whether or not it was what they had hoped for is yet to be determined.

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The Difference between a Penguin Refresh and Update

As I mentioned above, a website that has been negatively impacted by the Penguin algorithm cannot recover, unless Google manually updates the algorithm, or refreshes the current version of that algorithm. So what is the difference between an algorithm update and an algorithm refresh? I’m glad you asked …

What is an Algorithm Refresh?

An algorithm refresh simply means Google has not modified, removed or added any new signals to a previously introduced algorithm. Think of it as running anti-virus software, except that all of the “viruses” (a.k.a. spammy tactics) it finds when it is initially rolled out are not allowed to impact your “computer” (a.k.a. website) again.

But just like with viruses, there are always variations of spammy SEO strategies being utilized, so as to try and stay one step ahead of the “software” (i.e. algorithm). Google can then run a refresh of their algorithm, in hopes that they will catch any new spammy tactics that have been used since the previous refresh or update. However, just like anti-virus software, these refreshes can become obsolete as SEO’s find new ways to avoid the algorithm. That’s when an update comes in handy.

What is an Algorithm Update?

An algorithm update means Google has modified, removed, or added new signals to a pre-existing algorithm, in hopes that these signals will catch any new strategy variations that previous updates had missed. Again, using the previous analogy; it would be just like Norton providing updates to the anti-virus software on your computer, in hopes of catching any newly found viruses, or variations of old ones.

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What Do We Know About Penguin 3.0 So Far?

It’s tough to say at this point. Commentary from Matt Cutts and other Google representatives led us all to believe that the next version of Penguin was to be a significant update, which implied new signals would be introduced. Barry Schwartz wrote an article at the beginning of October that suggested a Penguin 3.0 update may come as soon as within a week following his post. Barry made this prediction based on input provided by Gary Illyes, a Google Webmaster Trends Analyst who apparently was involved in working on the algorithm. However, it seems Barry may have been a bit too ambitious with his choice of words, as Gary even commented on Google+, “I love how you guys could twist “soon” into this”. Some useful insights on the Penguin algorithm were extracted from Barry’s post though.

Penguin Insights:

  • Gary confirmed that a disavow file (which is a .txt file you can submit within Google Webmaster Tools that pretty much indicates to Google which backlinks pointing to your site you do not want any credit from) are taken into consideration when the Penguin algorithm is updated or refreshed.
  • Disavow files submitted after two weeks prior to Gary’s presentation at SMX East would not be taken into consideration in this next iteration of the Penguin update/refresh.
  • Google is working on speeding up the rate at which future Penguin refreshes will happen.

In a Google+ Hangout session on October 20th, John Mueller stated that as far as he knows, the Penguin update had rolled out completely – but when asked by Barry to clarify if it was indeed an update or just a refresh, he declined to comment. However, that same day, he then followed up with Barry in a Google+ comment stating, “I might have spoken a bit early, hah – it looks like things may still be happening. I’ll double-check in the morning.”

It turns out that John did indeed jump the gun in stating Penguin had rolled out completely, as Pierre Farr (who works at Google UK) stated the following:

“On Friday last week, we started rolling out a Penguin refresh affecting fewer than 1% of queries in US English search results. This refresh helps sites that have already cleaned up the webspam signals discovered in the previous Penguin iteration, and demotes sites with newly-discovered spam.

It’s a slow worldwide roll-out, so you may notice it settling down over the next few weeks.”

Notice the choice of words in his first sentence – Penguin refresh? Although it’s not an official confirmation, it definitely suggests that this iteration of Penguin is indeed just a refresh and not an actual update of the algorithm. He then goes on to state refresh again in the next line, and his definition of what this refresh does pretty much coincides with what you would expect from a typical refresh; not an update. Lastly, he confirms that this refresh (which supposedly impacts < 1%) is still rolling out worldwide, and as such, fluctuations in rankings and traffic can be expected to last for the next few weeks.

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What Can Should You Do?

First and foremost, it is of the utmost importance that you DO NOT panic. As we’ve seen with rolling updates (which so far have only been confirmed with the Panda update), they can take some time to impact all websites. And in some instances, we have seen rankings move up, down, and up again over the period of a roll-out (and significantly in some cases).

Don't panic; organize your SEO strategies!

Don’t panic; organize your SEO strategies!

So before you decide on throwing in the flag, wait to see how your websites traffic and impressions are impacted. If you see noticeable positive increases, then keep on doing what you’re doing, as it’s obviously working at this point in time. And if you see that your website was negatively impacted by Google, then it’s important to understand why, so you can develop a strategy to fix the issues on your website, or within your backlink profile.

Fortunately for us and our client’s, we build the majority of our clients’ websites from scratch, so it would be rare that one of our sites would be targeted as a result of their onsite work. Much more common scenarios are domains that were involved in unscrupulous link building campaigns prior to hiring our services. Nevertheless, we’re adequately prepared to tackle either issue, should they arise, and want any webmasters reading this blog post to be prepared as well.

Below Are Some Steps You Can Take to Help You Recover from Penguin:

Step 1 – Review Your Analytics Data

It is important to know if your site has been impacted, and which pages in particular, before you can devise a strategy to keep Penguin from targeting you. What my team and I do is look at only Google organic analytic’s data, comparing traffic of landing pages for the 2 – 4 weeks following the day the algorithm rolled out to the same amount of time immediately prior. You have to compare apples to apples (i.e. looking at Monday – Sunday vs the previous Monday – Sunday) in order to get an accurate representation of what your traffic trend should look like.

Also, it’s important to look at absolute data vs. average data, as the number of visits lost is much more telling of a sign vs. the average percentage (as you could have a -100% decrease to a specific landing page, but that does not really tell you anything if the page was getting 4 visits in those two weeks prior and is now getting none).

Step 2 – Understand Why Certain Landing Pages Were Targeted

Penguin can and does impact traffic to your entire site, but more often than not, specific landing pages are the cause of you being targeted in the first place (especially if you’re dealing with onsite spam vs. low quality backlinking). So what you need to do is evaluate the pages on your site you have deemed as being targeted and determine why Google thinks those pages are spammy. Are you stuffing important keywords or mentions of a geo-target within the content or headers? Are the Meta tags extremely long and stuffed with near identical variations of a keyword? For further guidance, you can read my previous post on Penguin 2.1, where I specify the instances of onsite spam I would be consider “Penguin bait”.

And beyond onsite, you also have to take into consideration offsite work: backlinks. Using www.MajesticSeo.com, we are able to evaluate the quality, quantity and methodologies our clients’ have used in the past to build backlinks for their website. My blog post on “How to Recover from a Google Unnatural Linking Penalty” will walk you through the steps on not only identifying spammy backlinks, but how to disavow them as well.

Step 3 – Take Action!

As pointed out above, understanding why you have been targeted by Penguin is the key to recovering. Once you have identified the culprit strategies, you need to work diligently on remedying them. If spammy onsite is to blame, then you need to work on cleaning up the SEO strategies you have in place on your website. If spammy backlinks are to blame, then you need to identify what backlinks are harming your site and work on asking the webmasters of the linking sites to remove those links.

And always remember: what may have worked wonderfully in the past will not always work as well in the future, so just appreciate the ride you had enjoyed, implement a revised search engine optimization strategy as soon as possible, clean up what needs to be cleaned up on or offsite, and hope that a future refresh or update of the Penguin algorithm will work in your favor.

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The Google Algorithm Frenzy:
Pigeon, HTTPS, Authorship and MUCH More

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

On July 3, 2014, Matt Cutts declared to the search community that he was going on leave for 4 months, all the way through October. Upon hearing the news, I had a big sigh of relief. For you see, I thought to myself, “There is absolutely no way Google is going to launch any algorithms or make any significant updates to their existing algorithms while the face of their search quality department was on leave of absence.” I mean, who are SEO’s going to yell at and blame for all of their woes while he is away, right? John Mueller, a Google Webmaster Trends Analyst, tends to navigate Google’s help forums and host Google Hangouts, giving advice on how to build a website that’s both user and search engine friendly, would be my first guess – but is he adequately prepared to fend off the masses of SEO questions ahead?

Screenshot of Matt Cutts stating he is going on leave in 2014

A screenshot of Matt Cutts stating he is going on leave in 2014.

 

Google Algorithms Launched and Updated in 2014

Well, it turns out that Google had no plans for holding back during Matt’s absence. In fact, it seems they’ve decided to turn up the heat a bit. They’ve made quite a splash with announcing two new algorithms, and there have even been a couple periods of unconfirmed algorithm changes hitting the streets, causing significant SERP (search engine ranking placement) changes. But before we get into the more recent algorithms, let’s first have a quick look at the algorithms that Google has acknowledged have launched or been updated, prior to Matt skipping town.

Page Layout Algorithm #3

Release Date: February 6, 2014

The Page Layout algorithm (originally referred to as, “Ads above the Fold” algorithm) was first launched on January 19, 2012, and then updated in October 9, 2012. Google believes having too much ad-space / advertisements above the page fold of a website provides for a bad user experience, so the algorithm aims to hinder the rankings of websites that are dominantly ad heavy. In trying to find what impact the Page Layout algorithm had on our 130+ HVAC, plumbing and electrical clients, I found that this algorithm negatively impacted any thin content pages. And I also suspected that it treated having too many images above the page fold the same as having too many advertisements. Moral of the story is to try and have as much unique and valuable content above the page fold as possible instead of having too many images or ad’s.

Unnamed Update

Release Date: March 24, 2014

Although it was never publicly confirmed by Google, there was a major shake-up in the SERPs around March 24 – 25. According to Moz.com’s documented Google Algorithm Change History, SEO’s speculated this was the softer Panda update Matt Cutts confirmed at SMX West 2014 would be rolling out relatively soon.

Payday Loan 2.0

Release Date: May 16, 2014

The Payday Loan algorithm was first introduced by Matt Cutts via Twitter on June 11, 2013. In his tweet, he suggested webmasters watch a video he posted previously in which he discussed some upcoming changes to Google’s search. In the video, he hints that the algorithm is geared towards cleaning up search results that tend to be more aggressively spammed than others, such as payday loan, Viagra, gambling, pornographic and other like keywords.

Panda 4.0

Release Date: May 19, 2014

In what’s now becoming a more common thing, Google is releasing significant algorithm updates within short periods of one another, in what I believe is a tactic to help make it more difficult for SEO’s (such as myself) from reverse engineering the exact metrics their algorithms target. Apparently Matt Cutts stated the algorithm started rolling out on May 20, but the SERP data Moz.com collects indicated it may have started a day earlier.

Payday Loan 3.0

Release Date: June 12, 2014

Not even a month after the 2nd confirmed update for the Payday Loan algorithm, we received word from Google that they launched yet another update. According to Barry Schwartz’s Search Engine Roundtable article, Matt Cutts stated that the 2.0 update not only helped to better prevent negative SEO (the black hat art of pointing spammy, irrelevant and/or low quality backlinks to competitor sites), but it also specifically targeted spammy websites. Whereas this 3rd update more so targeted spammy search queries, which is consistent with what the initial algorithm did.

Authorship Photo Dropped

Release Date: June 28, 2014

This is more so a SERP display change rather than an algorithm update, but it is significant enough of a change to have earned a spot on this list. John Mueller announced on June 25, 2014 that Google would no longer be showing authorship photos within their search results. Many webmasters, including myself, noticed in the days and weeks prior to the official announcement that there were some rare instances of authorship photos disappearing, but I don’t believe any of us would have believed Google would have removed the authorship photos entirely. Nevertheless, Google has opted to leave the authorship name, which links directly to the Google+ profile for the respective authors, as well as the date of when the blog article was published. You can see an example of this in the screenshot below showing my authorship info for my blog post on keyword cannibalization.

Screenshot of the authorship search result for my post on keyword cannibalization

A screenshot of the authorship search result for my post on keyword cannibalization.

 

Above I discussed new, updated and unconfirmed algorithm tweaks that occurred prior to Matt Cutts going on leave.

Below are the algorithm’s which launched after Matt Cutts going on leave.

Pigeon Algorithm

Release Date: July 24, 2014

This update was actually never officially named internally at Google. So in an attempt to make it easier for SEO’s to reference it later, Search Engine Land (SEL) was, as usual, quick to dub this algorithm – they decided on “Pigeon.” Keeping with the theme of P-named algorithm updates (i.e. Panda, Penguin, Payday Loan, Page Layout), SEL felt this name was appropriate because this algorithm specifically targeted local search results, and “Pigeons tend to fly back home.”

Now getting to the good stuff – what we do know about this algorithm is that it is said to be the 2nd largest algorithm to be released since the Venice update. Barry Schwartz also claims Google told him that the new local-focused algorithm particularly made local SERP ranking signals similar to that of organic SERP ranking signals, and that it improved their ability to better interpret and factor in both distance and location for improved local ranking. To me, this suggests that websites will have a harder time ranking locally for cities in which they are no physically located within.

MozCast’s Google SERP Feature Graph, a tool that shows changes in Google SERP results, indicated a local SERP drop from 19.3% to a low of 9.2% within the days following the algorithm’s launch and a slight increase of knowledge graph results, from 26.7% to 28%.

Screenshot of the MozCast Google SERPs Feature Graph tool showing the impact of the Pigeon algorithm update

A screenshot of the MozCast Google SERPs Feature Graph tool showing the impact of the Pigeon algorithm update.

 

The commonality spotted by many SEO’s in the industry is that there are many keyword phrases which used to show a local map pack, but no longer do (Mike Blumenthal, a well-known local SEO expert, noticed that real estate type keywords in particular seemed to be the ones that were most significantly impacted, which he indicates in his comment here). Moz’s graph is showing that local search results seem to have regulated back to normal around July 29, 2014 – Barry Schwartz reached out to Google to confirm if we were already seeing a fresh of the Pigeon algorithm, but they would not confirm nor deny.

HTTPS / SSL Algorithm

Release Date: August 6, 2014

During my trip to SMX West this year, Matt Cutts stated that he would love to see websites that utilize SSL certificates (i.e. https://www.wellsfargo.com; note the HTTPS vs. HTTP, which means this website is secured) receive a ranking boost for providing a secured website to their websites visitors. Well, it seems he knew more than he was letting on – five months later and Google officially announced that they now provide a minor ranking boost to websites that have SSL certificates installed. They also suggested that they might increase the weight of this ranking signal in the future.

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The Google Algorithms Keep Coming, and Coming, and Coming ….

As you can see, we SEO’s have our hands full. There are only a handful of algorithms (out of the hundreds of updates Google makes per year) that are significant enough for Google to publicly announce, but it truly is a never ending battle. One day you might have 1st page rankings for “Denver Plumber”, the next week you could fall off to the 5th page or even farther, and then you could find yourself ranking higher in the weeks following.

My seven plus years of SEO experience has taught me that Google’s SERPs are in a never-ending state of flux, but if you build and optimize your website to the highest standard, you tend to not have to worry about any sort of negative impact from these frequent updates. And this holds true with the majority of client’s here at iMarket Solutions. We only utilize white hat methodologies, and we stay up to date on Google’s quality guidelines and the algorithms they do publicly announce, so we know exactly what Google prefers in a website.

We and our methodologies aren’t perfect; we have had some clients’ who have seen negative results from algorithmic changes, but I’ve learned to accept that as collateral damage, if you will. It’s simply impossible to build a perfect website and marketing campaign, especially with so many great minds and websites competing with our own, and to not expect some sort of backwards movement at one time or another. The important thing to do in those situations though, which is pretty much a favorite past-time of ours, is to review ranking, Google Analytics and Google Webmaster Tools data to try and determine which pages or strategies an algorithm has targeted on a site, and to use that knowledge to better your methodologies as a whole. This is what iMarket Solutions does on a weekly basis for our clients’, and a large reason as to why we are capable of building such successful SEO campaigns.

 

If you are in the HVAC, electrical, plumbing or home remodeling industry and want a website that dominates organic search results, feel free to give us a call – (800) 825-7935!

 And if you have any questions or comments regarding this blog post, I’d love to hear about them below.

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The Google Penguin 2.1 Algorithm Update Is Here, And It’s Scarier Than Ever!

Friday, October 4th, 2013

Scary Penguin 2.1 algorithm update

 

All right, so maybe Google’s Penguin 2.1 algorithm update isn’t nearly as scary as the picture above. But with Halloween right around the corner, would you expect anything less?

Go ahead, share it with your friends – you know you want to.

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What Is the Penguin Algorithm, You Ask?

Although Penguin 2.1 doesn’t have glaring red eyes, snarling fangs, and a tattoo on its upper right shoulder, I know many webmasters would rather tango with the beast portrayed above rather than Google’s infamous Penguin algorithm. Matt Cutts, the head of the Google Web Spam team (a.k.a. the Search Quality team) announced via Twitter the launch of the Penguin 2.1 update. And of course, it wasn’t long before the story was covered by Danny Sullivan of Search Engine Land.

Google first released the Penguin algorithm on April 24, 2012. At the time, many SEO’s largely considered it to be the beginning of the end of search engine optimization. And for many website owners that indulged in paid, spamming or low quality link building or black hat onsite tactics, it was just that. In fact, Matt Cutts reported that the first Penguin algorithm impacted 3.1% of English search queries. Fortunately, Penguin 2.1 only “affects less than 1% of searches to noticeable degree”, again, as reported by Matt Cutts.

Since the inception of Penguin in 2012, there have been four other modifications to the algorithm, with Penguin 2.1 being the fifth and most recent change made to the algorithm. Keep in mind, Google only upgrades the point system a full number when they feel a significant enough amount of modifications have been made to the algorithm for them to consider it to be a full algorithm update. In instances where there were only minor modifications made to the previous algorithm, like with Penguin 2.1, they tend to only change the increments by decimal points; similar to how WordPress categorizes their installation updates.

What Does Penguin 2.1 Look for?

It’s likely that Penguin 2.1 looks for everything that the preceding Penguin algorithms have looked for, but it’s hard to say at this point in time. To give you some history: when the first Penguin algorithm was released, no one knew what to expect. As the months passed, certain characteristics emerged that were synonymous with someone who was negatively affected by a Penguin update being released. But what no one had anticipated was that the first Penguin algorithm likely only analyzed and took action on back links pointing to the homepage (or at the very least, only top level pages of a site). This of course wasn’t discovered until Penguin 2 was announced, and Matt Cutts hinted at the fact that Penguin 2 went much deeper into a website than the original Penguin algorithm.

My personal understanding of the Penguin algorithm, based on my own research and personal experiences, is that it largely targets the following:

  • Low quality links
  • Spammy links
  • Paid links that are not marked as nofollow
  • Spammy or black hat SEO techniques
  • Article syndication links
  • Forum or blog posting abuse (such as planting links within forum signatures, or creating really low quality blog posts on 3rd party sites, like Blogger, for the sole sake of acquiring backlinks)
  • Large amounts of exact match keywords used within external links
  • Large amounts of backlinks coming from one website (usually referred to as site wide links)
  • Widget links
  • Aggressive link exchanges
  • In fact, pretty much anything listed on the Google Link Schemes page, which is a part of the quality guidelines set forth by Google

Keep in mind the Penguin algorithm is just that – an algorithm. There is no human intervention. It follows a formula that was designed by the engineers working at Google, and adjusts how a website or a specific webpage ranks, based on its analysis of that entity. It is my own personal belief that the Penguin algorithm acts as a flagging system for the Google Search Quality team, alerting them to instances of unnatural linking. I believe this is how they were able to assign so many manual actions (a.k.a. unnatural linking penalties) to websites throughout 2012 – 2013. Granted, Google does claim that every manual action is reviewed manually by an actual human being, but too many websites were penalized for this process to not be somewhat automated.

As a side note: if your website is showing you have a manual action within Google Webmaster Tools and you want to better understand what you can do to remove it, read my blog post to learn how to recover from a Google unnatural linking penalty.

How Can I Keep Track of These Penguin Changes and Other Algorithm Updates?

Besides having to troll through countless SEO blogs, in hopes of keeping up-to-date with all the most recent Google algorithm changes or modifications you have a few more options for staying in the loop.

  1. Subscribe to RSS feeds. Fortunately, there’s no getting around it. SEO sites like SearchEngineLand.com and SERoundTable.com are constantly reporting on all things SEO. In many cases, they’ll learn of an algorithm change or feature introduction far before others in the industry will have. Sites like these I was always have an RSS feed which you can sync to your RSS reader, delivering the stories directly to your computer, email, or mobile phone.
  2. Read our blog. We at iMarket Solutions love to read about SEO to help us stay on top of our game, and we equally enjoy writing about it. As such, we feel it’s in the best interest of our clients and our readers to keep them all up-to-date all of the most important search engine related updates. With that being said, feel free to keep an eye on our blog for all of the latest SEO news and tips.
  3. Bookmark the Google algorithm change history webpage. Moz.com is one of the most trusted sources in the search engine optimization industry. Originally, they started off as SEO consultants. But their love of SEO and helping people grew so much beyond what they had initially anticipated, that they had change of heart; decidedly choosing to help SEO’s become better at what they do so they can better assist their own clients. One of the ways they help SCO’s is by keeping track of all of the Google algorithm update changes – and now you can too, by bookmarking this page.

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In Conclusion

One thing is for certain – Google sure has been busy. With the introduction of the Google Hummingbird algorithm, their LARGEST algorithm release in over a decade, it is most certain that many webmasters will see some sort of fluctuation with their rankings, traffic and leads. The important thing is not to panic. If you are an iMarket Solutions client, chances are slim you will be negatively affected by Penguin 2.1, as we only engage in white hat SEO (also referred to as “best practices” throughout the industry), and only pursue organic link opportunities. If by chance you do experience any dramatic shifts in rankings, traffic or leads, do be sure to give us a call. We can have an SEO specialist look at your website to determine what is affecting your website and come up with an actionable plan to reverse the results.

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